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Worker Classification: Employee vs. Contractor


If you hire someone for a long-term, full-time project or a series of projects that are likely to last for an extended period, you must pay special attention to the difference between independent contractors and employees. The Tax and Social security offices scrutinize the distinction between employees and independent contractors because many business owners try to categorize as many of their workers as possible as independent contractors rather than as employees. They do this because independent contractors are not covered by unemployment and workers' compensation, or by payroll taxes, social security payments, hour, anti-discrimination, and labour laws.  If you incorrectly classify an employee as an independent contractor, you can be held liable for employment taxes for that worker, plus a penalty.


Independent Contractors are individuals who contract with a business to perform a specific project or set of projects. You, the payer, have the right to control or direct only the result of the work done by an independent contractor, and not the means and methods of accomplishing the result. Employees provide work in an ongoing, structured basis. In general, anyone who performs services for you is your employee if you can control what will be done and how it will be done. A worker is still considered an employee even when you give them freedom of action. What matters is that you have the right to control the details of how the services are performed.


One of the most prevalent approaches used to categorize a worker as either an employee or independent contractor considers the following:


- What instructions the employer gives the worker about when, where, and how to work. The more specific the instructions and the more control exercised, the more likely the worker will be considered an employee.
- What training the employer gives the worker. Independent contractors generally do not receive training from an employer.
- The extent to which the worker has business expenses that are not reimbursed. Independent contractors are more likely to have unreimbursed expenses.
- The extent of the worker's investment in the worker's own business. Independent contractors typically invest their own money in equipment or facilities.
- The extent to which the worker makes services available to other employers. Independent contractors are more likely to make their services available to other employers.
- How the business pays the worker. An employee is generally paid by the hour, week, or month. An independent contractor is usually paid by the job.
- The extent to which the worker can make a profit or incur a loss. An independent contractor can make a profit or loss, but an employee does not.
- Whether there are written contracts describing the relationship the parties intended to create. Independent contractors generally sign written contracts stating that they are independent contractors and setting forth the terms of their employment.
- Whether the business provides the worker with employee benefits, such as insurance, a pension plan, vacation pay, or sick pay. Independent contractors generally do not get benefits.
- The terms of the working relationship. An employee generally is employed at will (meaning the relationship can be terminated by either party at any time). An independent contractor is usually hired for a set period.
- Whether the worker's services are a key aspect of the company's regular business. If the services are necessary for regular business activity, it is more likely that the employer has the right to direct and control the worker's activities. The more control an employer exerts over a worker, the more likely it is that the worker will be considered an employee.


Questions about how to classify workers? Don't hesitate to call the office and speak to a tax professional who can assist you.